Insane Facts and Stories Behind The Groovy Photos Of Woodstock 1969

February 21, 2024

Cows were wandering the festival grounds

Woodstock has been a beautiful memory for more than 50 years, and while it doesn't feel like it's been that long since half a million people grooved in upstate New York, a golden anniversary is a great reason to look back at some nostalgic photos.

From August 15 - 18, 1969 half a million people showed up to dance and groove in the mud while artists like Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and The Who jammed for hours on end. Woodstock is remembered as three days of peace, love, and music, but in order to put this monumental festival together a lot of things had to come together. People often wonder about the ins and outs of the festival: How much were the bands paid? How big was the farm? And how much did tickets cost for Woodstock? We've got all those answers for you and much more on this rundown of what life was really like for people attending the Woodstock festival in 1969.

What did people eat? Who is the elusive Woodstock baby? And what was it like being stuck in all that traffic? You want to know, we've got answers. Rock on! 

source: pinterest

Woodstock was crawling with a few different types of animals during the three days of peace, love, and music - specifically hippies and cows. It’s important to remember that Woodstock was being held at an actual working dairy farm which means that there were cows not too far away from where bands were rocking out in the rain.

Even though the cows were initially corralled away from the festival goers, when hippies broke down the barriers in order to get onto the grounds they unded all of the farm’s hard work. Rather than attempt to catch the cows and push them into another fenced in area the ranch hands just decided to let the cows mingle with the hippies and things worked out okay.

Woodstock was home to Groovy and Global Fashion

(pinterest)

Fashion at the Woodstock Festival in 1969 was a reflection of the era’s counterculture and hippie movement. The festival was a gathering of nearly half a million people, and it became a melting pot of fashion styles and trends, often mixing ethnic clothing pieces to create unique and interesting combinations. It was not uncommon to see a Native American style buckskin vest adorned with beadwork paired with a Jamaican skirt or an African dashiki worn under a South American poncho. People were also seen sporting wide-legged pants with Indian tunics, creating a perfect blend of various cultures. For footwear, festival-goers often opted for desert-chic sandals or furry tribal boots, while many others preferred to go barefoot, embracing the bohemian spirit of the festival. Mixing and matching patterns and cultures was considered fashionable and trendy at Woodstock, encapsulating the free-spirited nature of the era.